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Inside CHIO Aachen 2021: With Rolex Grand Slam Live Contender Daniel Deusser, shooting star Brian Moggre and event director Frank Kemperman

Monday, 20 September 2021
CHIO Aachen 2021

Daniel Deusser wins the Rolex Grand Prix of Aachen and becomes the new Rolex Grand Slam Live Contender

Photo @ Rolex Grand Slam / Ashley Neuhof Daniel Deusser and Killer Queen VDM won the Rolex Grand Prix of Aachen. Photo @ Rolex Grand Slam / Ashley Neuhof.

 

Press release from the Rolex Grand Slam of Show Jumping

 


 

The world’s most distinguished show jumpers and their equine partners contested the highlight class of 2021’s edition of CHIO Aachen: the Rolex Grand Prix. The third Major of 2021’s Rolex Grand Slam of Show Jumping, the 1m60 test, created by leading course designer, Frank Rothenberger, comprised 40 starters from 15 nations. Amongst them was current world number one, Daniel Deusser, current world number three and Rolex Testimonee, Martin Fuchs, winner of the 2021 CP ‘International’, presented by Rolex and fellow Testimonee, Steve Guerdat, reigning Olympic Individual champion, Ben Maher, plus another 11 of the world’s current top 30-ranked riders.

The tense action played out in front of approximately 19,000 knowledgeable show jumping fans in CHIO Aachen’s Hauptstadion, a truly iconic stadium which also hosted the sport’s World Championships in 2006 and European Championships in 2015. The format was simple: following the Rolex Grand Prix’s first round, the best 18 riders would qualify for Round 2, with a jump-off triggered should any riders' combined scores be tied. In the case of a jump-off, the rider with the fewest penalties and fastest time would be crowned champion.

Clear rounds combined with fast times saw three of the sport’s greatest riders comfortably progress to the second round: Great Britain’s Ben Maher and his 12-year-old megastar gelding, Explosion W; the first and only rider to win the Rolex Grand Slam, Scott Brash and his 12-year-old gelding, Hello Jefferson; and Steve Guerdat and his 12-year-old gelding, Venard de Cerisy. However, it was Mexico’s Patricio Pasquel, who topped the leader board at the end of the first round, after he and his 14-year-old gelding, Babel, finished over two and a half seconds ahead of next fastest rider, America’s rising talent, Brian Moggre.

Other riders of note to make the cut of 18, included the sport’s current highest-ranked rider, Daniel “Double D” Deusser of Germany, Frenchman Kevin Staut, Martin Fuchs from Switzerland, winner of the Rolex Grand Slam Major at CHIO Aachen in 2017, Belgium’s Gregory Wathelet, and the next generation of show jumping talent, 22-year-old American rider, Lucy Deslauriers and 23-year-old Sanne Thijssen from The Netherlands. 

Consisting of 15 fences, and over a very slightly shorter course than the first, home favourite Deusser soon assumed control of the second round, the first of the 18 riders to go double clear. He was followed by Belgian, Jérôme Guery, confirming a jump-off would decide who would become the new Rolex Grand Slam Live Contender, after the last Major winner, Steve Guerdat, failed to record a clear round. Guery’s Tokyo 2020 Team bronze medal-winning teammate, Gregory Wathelet started a procession of double clears, with Laura Kraut from the USA, Scott Brash, Ben Maher and Brian Moggre all booking their places in the final showdown, thereby making it a mouth-watering seven-way jump-off.

First to go in the jump-off was Daniel Deusser and his 11-year-old mare, Killer Queen, meticulously navigating the nine-fence course and recording the first double clear. Deusser held on to top spot after Gregory Wathelet finished clear but was over a second off his pace, while Scott Brash, Ben Maher, Laura Kraut and Jérôme Guery all recorded faults. Last to go, Brian Moggre and his 15-year-old stallion, Balou du Reventon, were Deusser’s last remaining threat; however, despite an impressive clear round, the 20-year-old from Texas crossed the line 0.31s off Deusser’s time, which meant a new Rolex Grand Slam of Show Jumping Live Contender was crowned. 

On his first Rolex Grand Slam of Show Jumping Major victory, Deusser, commented: “The Rolex Grand Slam is part of equestrian history. So far, I haven’t been in this position of winning one of these four Major Grands Prix, but I’m now looking forward to trying my best at the next three stages.

On his partner, Balou du Reventon, runner-up, Brian Moggre, commented: “I really think our personality types are similar. I didn’t really give myself a chance to not get along with him, so I’m glad he liked me. We have just gone step by step, and he wants this just as much as I do. He’s a really competitive horse and I find myself a bit of a competitive rider, so we mesh well and I’m very thankful for him.”

 

 


 

Meet the Next Gen with: Brian Moggre

Photo @ Rolex Grand Slam / Peggy Schröder Brian Moggre. Photo @ Rolex Grand Slam / Peggy Schröder.

What are your plans, dreams and ambitions for 2022? 

The World Championships being next summer is a huge goal of mine, so I’m starting to really focus on that. Otherwise, just focusing on the young horses stepping up and developing them. 

What is the proudest moment of your career so far? 

There have been a few, for different reasons. But I’d say one that’s very special to me was my first 3* Grand Prix win at Live Oak, which was on my junior jumper, who I’d had for several years, so it was a big win for both of us. 

Who has inspired you the most throughout your career? 

So many different people, it would be hard to just pick one. Currently, there’s Laura Kraut and Nick Skelton, who are both helping me – they’re a huge inspiration. My parents inspire me, and Lesley Leeman, who takes care of my horses – she inspires me every day, she works so hard, and she take such good care of the horses. All of those people have inspired me to be my best self. 

What keeps you motivated and hungry for success? 

My love for the horses. It’s been my passion since I was a little kid, and I’ve never really known any different. I didn’t really come from a horse family, so it all starts with me. I’d say horses motivate me the most.

Which of your young horses are you most excited about? 

There’s one who I own myself called Mtm Los Angeles. He’s not really a young horse, but he had a really big seven-year-old year, so we took it really slow. He’s nine now so we’re getting him back on the scene again, and he seems really promising. There’s another one I ride called Nolo Contendere, who’s owned by Lindsay Maxwell. He’s a six-year-old and I think he’s got everything.

 

 


 

Word from the organiser with: Frank Kemperman, show director

Photo @ Rolex Grand Slam / Peggy Schröder. Frank Kemperman. Photo @ Rolex Grand Slam / Peggy Schröder.

You must be delighted that this year’s edition of the CHIO Aachen is going ahead, after last year’s cancellation due to COVID-19? 

We are very happy that we have managed to stage a CHIO this year, which has included all five disciplines, because the situation has been so difficult. On the one hand you can say we’ve had a long time to prepare, but on the other hand we’ve faced so many challenges, including changes to the programme and changes to the date. Then there is the situation with the spectators’ tickets, which were first moved from 2020 to 2021, with people given the choice whether they wanted their money back or to retain their tickets for this year’s event. Then we had to postpone the show from June to September, so we gave spectators the choice to defer their tickets to CHIO Aachen 2022, because we had no idea if 2021’s show would go ahead. Maybe it’s a little bit later in the year, but a CHIO with fewer spectators is better than no CHIO at all. 

Do you take any positives from the last 18 months? 

The main positive is that we’ve always looked forward and we’ve managed to stage this great event. There has also been so much goodwill from the fans. The reaction from the public to the situation that CHIO Aachen has faced has been amazing – their response has been really good for the soul, so we must thank them. 

For you, what makes the CHIO Aachen so special? 

Normally, I would say the crowd, because the crowd is at the heart of the event’s atmosphere, along with the riders and the horses. But for me, we always try to organise and create something superb, which has to be of the highest quality. For me and the organisers, the key word in everything that we do is quality, which is always more important than quantity. We always ensure that every element of the CHIO Aachen is 100% – for the spectators, the media, the sponsors, the officials, the athletes, for everyone.

 

 


 

The Rolex Grand Slam is considered by the sport to be the ultimate equestrian challenge, primarily due to the sporting prowess required to achieve this feat. It is a quest taken on by the world’s top riders, vying to secure the legendary status associated with winning the Rolex Grand Slam of Show Jumping.

The format of the Rolex Grand Slam of Show Jumping is simple: anyone who wins three Majors in a row receives the Rolex Grand Slam trophy and a €1 million bonus on top of the class’s prize-money. If that same rider then continues their success by winning a fourth Major in succession, they will be rewarded with an additional €1million bonus. If two shows are won in succession, the bonus is €500,000 or if an athlete wins only 2 majors in a period of four successive shows, the bonus is €250,000.



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